Ocean Conservation

Pledge to End Ocean Plastics

We know our oceans and coastlines are choking on plastic. We’ve all seen plastic bottles, food wrappers and plastic bags polluting beaches, and been horrified by the stories of marine creatures like seabirds and whales starving when their stomachs become packed full of plastic. More…

Another Reason to Ditch Plastic—It Smells Like Food to Fish

We know that the massive amount of plastic that’s continually dumped into our oceans can end up in the stomachs of marine species (and ultimately on our plates), but why would they want to eat it?

Well, new research suggests that fish are not just accidentally gobbling up our plastic trash—they could be actively seeking it out because they like how the debris smells and are confusing it for their natural prey. More…

19 Aquariums Pledge to Fight Plastic Pollution, Ban Single-Use Plastic Bags and Straws

A collaboration of aquariums across the U.S. have launched a campaign Monday to reduce ocean and freshwater plastic pollution.

Notably, as of today, all 19 aquariums that belong to the Aquarium Conservation Partnership (ACP) have “eliminated” plastic straws and single-use carryout plastic bags at their facilities. More…

7 Shocking Facts About Plastics in Our Oceans

The oceans are massive, pulsing, vibrant bodies of water that serve humanity in countless ways—from providing food to enabling commerce to simply being beautiful.

But these powerful expanses of sea are not invincible. Each year, human activity erodes marine life in some way. More…

Clean Water Scarcity in sub-Saharan Africa

Africa is home to the largest number of water-scarce countries in the world. Of an estimated 800 million people who live in sub-Saharan Africa, 300 million live in a water stressed environment. By 2030 this scarcity will likely displace anywhere between 24 million and 700 million people as conditions become increasingly unlivable. More…

2014 Global Ocean Health Index

oceanindexThe Global Ocean Health Index calculates an annual global score for ocean health in 221 coastal regions and 15 sectors of the high seas, based on dozens of the best scientific sources available. More…

Greenhouse Pollution and the Dangers of Ocean Acidification

The excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere caused by the burning of fossil fuels is absorbed by the ocean, where it changes the acid balance of seawater. The oceans are paying a price for this service. The repercussions for marine life may be enormous. More…